Low blood sugar during sports requires a plan

Low blood sugar during sports requires a plan

Brandon Green offers advice on having a low blood sugar plan

Low Blood Sugar during Sports
requires a Plan

“A good plan for a low blood sugar
is part of the game!”

A chili dog is not a good plan

Treating a low blood sugar during sports activities requires a plan. A chili dog from the concession stand is not a good plan.

This is one of my favorite stories about playing sports shortly after I was diagnosed at age 10. As often happens to athletes, I went low before one of my games. My dad went to the concession stand and brought me a big ole chili dog. I suppose a regular hot dog would have done the trick but this one was covered in tons of chili. Oh yea, and he added a Coke to top it off with!

Type 1 Diabetes & Sports requires a plan for blood sugars
A chili dog & a coke from
the concession stand
is not a good plan.
Thankfully, I figured
this out early in my sports
career or I would have
never made it to the NFL.

Playing for the NFL required diabetes discipline 

Yes, that was a solution to a low blood sugar. But I can assure you, still to this day, chili dogs and sports don’t really mix well together.

I have had lots of practice treating lows and playing sports since then. Playing football for the NFL really put a lot of pressure on me to make sure I was managing my blood sugars. In fact, getting to the NFL required a lot of discipline with my diabetes not because I wanted to be a good diabetic but because I wanted to be a good football player.

Keeping my mom off the field

Managing diabetes during all my years of playing various sports meant I needed a plan. I also learned that if I had a “plan” it would keep my mom off the field during Middle School and High School. Yes, that could be embarrassing and a little distracting while you are in the middle of a game.

My simple plan

So here is my simple plan that I found worked for me. And once my mom knew I had a plan, we could all stay focused on the game. As a family we had a T1D Game Plan.

Blood sugar plan for sports with type 1 diabetes

Now this is just a glimpse of part of my plan.

For more details on my total plan for intense workouts and games, you can view my Athletic Practices Guide for Diabetics.

Playing sports made me a better diabetic

Here is the beauty of this plan. It was a plan that worked for me. It was a plan my family knew I had.

Once I had a plan, I knew my mom would not have to come down and interrupt me on the sideline checking to see if I was ok. Trust me, coaches really don’t like your mom on the sideline!

It worked for us. It worked for me. It worked well enough for me to play college football and eventually the NFL. Playing sports made me a better diabetic because I had to know my body and be consistent with my plan.

Type 1 Diabetes & Sports requires a plan for blood sugars
This is an example of a
good plan for 
managing
Type 1 diabetes & sports. 

Keep water, Gatorade,
complex carbs
&
fast acting carbs on hand
for
high & low BGs!
Customize your plan to work for you!

Come up with a plan that works for you!

I encourage you to come up with a plan that works for you. Find a water/sports drink ratio and stick to it. Find a complex carbohydrate that works for you. My favorite “go to” is an apple and peanut butter.

Write your plan down and follow it! Being a disciplined diabetic helps you become a disciplined athlete! It’s a win, win!

 

Written by Brandon Green
published on 8/1/2017 by Type 1 To Go

Brandon Green was diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes at the age of 10. He has played a multitude of sports throughout High School. He has a degree in Kinesiology from Rice University where he played football throughout college. Brandon played in the NFL with the Jacksonville Jaguars, St. Louis Rams and ended his career with the Seattle Seahawks. In addition to playing sports at all levels, Brandon has coached Middle School and High School sports. For athletics and diabetes, he brings a complete perspective from player to coach.

An avid spokesman for Type 1 Diabetes, Brandon Green is a motivational speaker encouraging children and families living with diabetes. In addition to his professional career with Sundance Memory Care, he blogs and provides support for www.Type1ToGo.com. For more information on Brandon Green, please visit his page here.

For updates on blogs,
please LIKE our Facebook page
or Follow us on Twitter!

This information provided for general use only.
It is not intended as medical and/or legal advice.
Always consult your doctor for medical advice.
All Rights Reserved. 

 Related Blogs to this Post

Related Tools to this Topic

Athletic Practices Guide for Diabetics by Brandon Green

Coaches Playbook for Diabetics by Brandon Green 

Extracurricular Activities Checklist  (For Diabetic Students in Public School) 

Copyright © 2017 Type 1 To Go Resolutions. All Rights Reserved.
Disclosure & Disclaimer Page

Basics of Managing Diabetes and Sports

Basics of Managing Diabetes and Sports

Back to basics managing sports with Type 1 Diabetes

“When it comes to sports & diabetes,
there are basic principles that
must be 
followed for success.”

Back to the Basics
Managing Diabetes and Sports

Basic fundamentals don’t change

In the world of sports, there are basic principles that must (typically) be followed for success.

The games move so fast. They seem so big and complex. But sometimes they are won by just the right step, proper hand placement, or even  by just keeping your eyes and vision in the proper area.

There is room for creativity and there are a variety of approaches. But  the basic fundamentals don’t change.

Life before CGMs

I was speaking with someone my age recently about our experience with Type 1 Diabetes.

We were discussing how management of diabetes has changed over the years.

Specifically, we discussed how we did not always have the use of new technology that people start with today – like Continuous Glucose Monitors.

Type 1 Diabetes and Sports

The basics of sports & diabetes management got me into the NFL!

An advocate for CGMs

I have shared in previous blogs why I am a strong believer in CGMs for athletes. They are very useful especially if an athlete has the ability and financial means to use one.

But whether you have a CGM or not, you have to remember that there a basic principles to success with Type 1 Diabetes. Especially as an athlete.

And you must always have the ability to manage your diabetes with the basics… otherwise known as checking your own blood sugar!

Checking your BG with a meter

Being able to check your blood glucose with a meter is an extremely important tool for T1D athletes. A “back to the basics” meter should be part of your field supply kit. Though I am a huge fan of CGMs, you should always be prepared with a backup plan.

Based on my experience, it is highly likely something is going to happen at some point – an infusion site goes out or is ripped out just before that important tryout, or even in the middle of a critical game! It happens.

Feeling confident in managing your diabetes without your CGM will benefit you as an athlete. It will also improve your ability to compete no matter what is thrown at you on the athletic field. That’s the challenge with sports in general!

Always have an alternate plan

For those that typically use a CGM, having a simple alternate plan means there is no panic when the CGM isn’t available.

Instead you just move on to plan B.  With a plan B, your safety and ability to perform at your highest level isn’t hindered.

I did not always have a CGM 

I also want to remind those without a CGM that I did not have a CGM when I was diagnosed at age 10. Still, I was not going to let diabetes slow me down from the many sports I played!

I used the basics because honestly I didn’t have any other option when I was first diagnosed. It is great that there are so many tools available to us now! And I highly recommend using them if available to you.

Have a Plan B

But learn to be comfortable with managing the basics of diabetes.

Have a “Plan B”, so that you are ready no matter what your sport throws at you. That’s just one of the “basic” tips that helped me get into the NFL.

Good luck out there!  As an athlete and diabetic, it ends up that my high school coach was right… “when you take care of the little things, big things usually happen.”

For me, taking care of the little things means concentrating on the basics!

Written by Brandon Green
published on 7/24/2017 by Type 1 To Go

Brandon Green was diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes at the age of 10. He has played a multitude of sports throughout High School. He has a degree in Kinesiology from Rice University where he played football throughout college. Brandon played in the NFL with the Jacksonville Jaguars, St. Louis Rams and ended his career with the Seattle Seahawks. In addition to playing sports at all levels, Brandon has coached Middle School and High School sports. For athletics and diabetes, he brings a complete perspective from player to coach.

An avid spokesman for Type 1 Diabetes, Brandon Green is a motivational speaker encouraging children and families living with diabetes. In addition to his professional career with Sundance Memory Care, he blogs and provides support for www.Type1ToGo.com. For more information on Brandon Green, please visit his page here.

For updates on blogs,
please LIKE our Facebook page
or Follow us on Twitter!

This information provided for general use only.
It is not intended as medical and/or legal advice.
Always consult your doctor for medical advice.
All Rights Reserved. 

 Related Blogs to this Post

Related Tools to this Topic

Athletic Practices Guide for Diabetics by Brandon Green

Coaches Playbook for Diabetics by Brandon Green 

Extracurricular Activities Checklist  (For Diabetic Students in Public School) 

Copyright © 2017 Type 1 To Go Resolutions. All Rights Reserved.
Disclosure & Disclaimer Page

Finding a Silver Lining from DKA

Finding a Silver Lining from DKA

Finding the Silver Lining from Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Finding a Silver Lining from DKA

Diabetic Ketoacidosis at
Freshman Orientation Camp

In August 2015, our 18 year old Type 1 Diabetic son set off for his college freshman orientation camp.

He almost did not make it home alive.

DKA is a demon. It shows no mercy. It sneaks in on your bad days and is always waiting in the wings to grab you if you let your guard down.

Type 1 Diabetes and Sports

Tristan Edgar is a college student at
Texas Tech University in Texas. 

What is DKA?

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a complication from diabetes that can be serious and life-threatening. DKA is often a common factor when first diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes and can often be mistaken for flu symptoms. It also occurs during the management of the disease when the body is not receiving enough insulin to break down glucose. This forces the body to start breaking down fat as fuel and ketones are then released into the body. Elevated ketones in the urine, severe weight loss, extreme thirst, blurry vision, lethargy and disorientation are all signs of DKA. If left untreated, DKA will lead to coma and death. For more information on DKA, please visit Beyond Type 1 DKASource: Beyond Type 1 www.beyondtype1.org

 

Dehydration plays a role

DKA snagged my son within the first day of his camp. A stomach bug and dehydration gave DKA an invite to join his plans. No, his blood sugar was not necessarily high. It is important to note that blood sugars do not always have to be high for diabetic ketoacidosis.

Dehydration can have a huge impact as well. Combined with a stomach virus, that was a cocktail that could not be beat.

College freshmen are adults

Yes. The camp knew he was diabetic. Yes. They had a full clinic onsite. But a clinic that does not recognize the signs of DKA can’t help. A teen who does not realize how quickly things can go seriously wrong creates a perfect storm.

It is also important to remember, teens going off to college are adults. Due to HIPAA, a clinic will not take the initiative to call the parents.

Too sick to be here…at the hospital!

Between 6-7 hours after he stepped into the camp clinic, they sent a camp counselor to drive him to the hospital. He was so sick at this point, he needed to be in ICU!

The hospital took one look at him and said “He is too sick to be here!” So they shipped him  five hours by ambulance to the medical center in Houston. Two full time attendants on him – a moving Intensive Care Unit on wheels.

Very lucky

Everybody got very lucky on this one. Our son, our family and the university. We dodged the DKA bullet. And we ALL learned something very valuable.

With the development of new technology such as CGMs and close parental management, it is possible to go many years without a DKA incident.

That is fantastic for our T1s. But… that also means we forget.

DKA can be deadly

Unless your teen has had a recent diabetic ketoacidosis incident, it is easy for a teen to head off to college not realizing how serious and deadly it can be. And it’s fast. Immediate response to DKA is critical.

DKA likes to loom behind simple illnesses. Knowing how to handle a sick day is important for teens.

You can learn more about a College Sick Day plan here. 

Teach your Teen the Signs of DKA!

Headaches – Extreme Thirst – Frequent Urination
Fatigue & Weakness – Blurry Vision – Fruity Breath Odor
Rapid Deep Breathing –  Nausea & Vomiting
Pain in the abdomen – High Ketone Levels (blood/urine)
High Blood Glucose* – Dry/Flushed Skin

*BG does not always have to be high to develop ketones.
Dehydration and illness can impact DKA symptoms.

Remind your teen that these symptoms can also be mistaken for:
flu, virus, a stomach bug or strep throat.

Finding a silver lining

Our family tries to find the silver lining in the dark cloud of diabetes. We created Type 1 To Go Teen so we could share some of the challenges of T1D Teen years.

There are so many things to address before a teen leaves for college. DKA Awareness should be one of them.

Over the last year, I have spoken at many events. Parents and teens ask me what I think is the MOST important thing they should do to prepare to leave for college with diabetes.

My answer: Know the signs of DKA and have a Sick Day Plan.

DKA Awareness at the University

In addition to Type 1 To Go Teen, we have asked our son’s university to participate in the Beyond Type 1 DKA Campaign. University health services teams need to know the symptoms and seriousness of DKA.  They also need to be able to share that with their Type 1 students who are away from home for the first time.

We are losing too many young adults to DKA. That was almost us and we will never forget that. It was a great teachable opportunity for everyone involved.

Texas Tech University kicks off the Beyond Type 1 Type 1 Diabetes/DKA Campaign.

Texas Tech Health Services Team is “Guns Up” to promote
Type 1 Diabetes Awareness on their campuses!

A silver lining from my son’s DKA – Texas Tech University became the third Texas college to commit to the Beyond Type 1 DKA Awareness campaign. The Student Health Science center is a vital team player for our son’s well-being while he is at school.

I am super proud of Texas Tech University for increasing awareness for Type 1 Diabetes and DKA with their students.

Making friends at camp

Our son did not get to enjoy his college freshman orientation experience. Being in DKA prevented him from making new friends at the camp.

However, his friends made friends.  His friends introduced him to a sweet young girl from the camp the first week on campus.

They introduced him as “That kid who was in the hospital at camp”. She said “Oh, you’re that guy!” and he said “Yep, I’m THAT guy!”

And they have been together ever since!!!

Texas Tech Students support the Beyond Type 1 T1D/DKA Campaign

Tristan Edgar & Amanda Hodge met the first week at Texas Tech University.
They are excited to see Texas Tech increase Type 1 Diabetes awareness. 

That sweet girl has been a blessing to our family. Amanda is studying nursing and she keeps an eye on our Type 1 Diabetic son for us! She has even attended his endocrinology appointments with him. Our son adores her and so do we!

Now that’s truly finding a silver lining from DKA!!!

Written by Anne Imber
published on 7/12/2017 by www.Type1ToGo.com 

Anne Imber is the mom to a Type 1 Diabetic son diagnosed in 2009. As the Founder of Type 1 To Go Teen, Anne shares her experiences with other Type 1 families regarding many of the non-medical issues that Type 1 Diabetic Teens face. The website www.Type1ToGo.com provides support materials from her presentations. Anne is also the Co-Founder of Cy Fair Type One Connection, a T1 School Advocacy & Support Group for one of the largest school districts in Texas.

For updates on blogs,
please LIKE our Facebook page
or Follow us on Twitter!

This information provided for general use only.
It is not intended as medical and/or legal advice.
Always consult your doctor for medical advice.
All Rights Reserved. 

 Related Blogs to this Post

Related Pages to this Post

 

Copyright © 2017 Type 1 To Go Resolutions. All Rights Reserved.
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School Advocacy for Type 1 Diabetes

School Advocacy for Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 Diabetes School Advocacy Blog Post Beyond Type 1

School Advocacy for Type 1 Diabetes

A featured blog from Beyond Type 1

 

School support is an important issue for families living with Type 1 Diabetes.  Beyond Type 1, a global non-profit Type 1 Diabetes organization,  recently posted a blog written by Anne Imber about school advocacy for Type 1 Diabetes. BT1 featured the blog about the team of school advocates in Texas aiming to create a voice for their Type 1 families.

Cy Fair Type One Connection is group of T1D parents  striving to create a positive and pro-active relationship with their school system on behalf of all their Type 1 families.

Read more below on Cy Fair Type One Connection!

Cy Fair Type One

A T1D School Advocacy & Support Group 

CFTOC Core Team Members (left to right)
Amy Josefy, Anne Imber, Carolyn Boardman,
Angela Vinson and Robin Hall.
(Not pictured, Ilka McCraren, Courtney Livingston)

Amy Josefy & Carolyn Boardman lead other T1D causes too such as the BT1 DKA Awareness campaign in Texas. With the help of their friends, family and fellow Cy Fair Type One families, they packed and shipped materials for pediatricians across the state.

Texas DKA Awareness Campaign

Cy Fair Type One Leader, Robin Hall (far right) has two T1D boys. She has been mentoring families in Cypress for years.The CFTOC committee meets often to discuss and propose T1D school solutions based on community feedback.
CFTOC Families stay connected through a closed Facebook Group

Supporting Type 1 Diabetes Non-Profit Organizations & Causes

Cy Fair Type One Supports BT1 DKA Awareness Campaign

Cy Fair Type One Connection Teens help with the BT1 DKA Awareness campaign. From left to right, Matthew Boardman, Macey Parr and Jackson Sutter.  T1D Teens serve their community together through CFTOC.

CFISD Millsap JDRF School Walk

Cy Fair Type One Leader, Anne Imber, conducts and supports JDRF School Walks within her school district. Raising T1D awareness is a priority of CFTOC.

CFISD Millsap JDRF School Walk

Core Team Leader, Courtney Livingston, participates in Cy Fair Type One picnic for the American Diabetes Association’s Camp Rainbow.  Families raised money for this Type 1 Diabetes camp during this fun event.

Education and Connection 

CFTOC Educational T1D Event

Cy Fair Type One hosts educational events for the families with Type 1 Diabetes. Events include Teen Talk, 504s, Psychological Side of T1D, Preparing for Kindergarten with T1D and more.

Brandon Green speaks to families about playing sports with Type 1 Diabetes

Brandon Green, T1D and Retired NFL Football player, speaks to families about sports with Type 1 Diabetes. Cy Fair Type One focuses on Extracurricular Activities for T1D students.

Cy Fair Type One Camp Rainbow Picnic

Cy Fair Type One Connection is about connecting families living with Type 1 Diabetes. The group was formed to support one school district but events are always open to all families in the Houston, Texas area.

Written by Anne Imber
published on 5/30/2017
Anne Imber is the mom to a Type 1 Diabetic son diagnosed in 2009. As the Founder of Type 1 To Go Teen, Anne shares her experiences with other Type 1 families regarding many of the non-medical issues that Type 1 Diabetic Teens face. The website www.Type1ToGo.com provides support materials from her presentations. Anne is also the Co-Founder of Cy Fair Type One Connection, a T1 School Advocacy & Support Group for one of the largest school districts in Texas.

This information provided for general use only.
It is not intended as medical and/or legal advice.
Always consult your doctor for medical advice.
All Rights Reserved. 

Get updates on T1ToGo Blogs and Events
Like our Facebook Page

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T1D Extracurricular Activities and School Requirements

T1D Extracurricular Activities and School Requirements

T1D Extracurricular Activities and
School Requirements

School support is required

In our blog, 504 Plans and Extracurricular Activities  we addressed the risky gaps in care for Type 1 Diabetics. We had discovered parents were just assuming it was not covered by the school. Or simply, they picked up the slack and worry.

Simply stated – school support is legally required.

This does not mean the school has to keep the clinic open or provide a nurse. There are other various “accommodations”  a school can provide during the “off” hours to provide support.

Extracurricular Activities include
Band, Drill Team, Theater and more….

Here is what the school should provide:

  • Designate a TRAINED staff member to be responsible for the student during non-school hour Extracurricular Activities. This should also include all off-campus activities.
  • Provide Type 1 Diabetes Awareness Training to appropriate staff.
    • Differences between Type 1 vs. Type 2
    • Signs of High/Low blood sugars
    • Treatment responses for High/Low blood sugars
    • Emergency Response Procedure
    • Glucagon Training depending on the situation
  • Designate a staff member who will always have immediate access to emergency diabetes supplies.
    In some cases, requiring staff to carry and keep extra supplies throughout all activities on and off campus.
  • Depending on the activity and situation, the school may train staff in Glucagon administration.

Coaches Playbook for Diabetics

Share Brandon Green’s Handout with Coaches!

What is the parent’s role?

  • Informing the school of the student’s activity involvement.
  • Providing an extra set of emergency supplies including an EXTRA Glucagon.
  • Providing extra snacks/drinks for the activity
  • Knowing who is responsible for the child during activities. Know how to reach this person. This is important for parents who are monitoring on a CGM. During non-school hours, school phones may not be answered.
  • Allow the school to choose the staff member responsible to train. (The school can’t require non-medical staff to do training/treatment so another staff member may need to be chosen.)
  • Be ahead of the game. Inform the school with advance notice so they can train staff prior to the start of the extracurricular activity.
  • Don’t forget summer camps and summer training activities.

Communication is key

Good news! Most Extracurricular Activities occur in Middle School and High School. Even then, not all Type 1 Diabetic students may be able to self-manage completely depending on the stage since diagnosis. However, T1 students can and should communicate with their parents about a plan for these types of activities.

Communication is key when working with the school.

Information allows for accommodations

Most importantly, the Type 1 Diabetic student should not have to hide his condition to participate. Yes, there will be times a student may not be able to fully participate due to diabetes issues.

An informed and trained staff member should always accommodate the student in those situations. Diabetes should never prevent our kids from participating in the things they love.

Extracurricular Activities

Use this Checklist to Plan for Extracurricular Activities 

Type 1 To Go provides more information on reports and letters issued by the U.S. Department of Education specifically regarding students with disabilities and extracurricular activities. Please visit our Extracurricular Page for these resources.

In addition, T1TG offers the following To Go Tools for families including several guides from Brandon Green, T1D and former NFL football player. Check out the T1ToGo tools!

Extracurricular Activities with Type 1 Diabetes  is definitely a Team Sport between student, parents and school!

Get your game plan going!
Written by Anne Imber
published on 5/22/2017

Anne Imber is the mom to a Type 1 Diabetic son diagnosed in 2009. As the Founder of Type 1 To Go Teen, Anne shares her experiences with other Type 1 families regarding many of the non-medical issues that Type 1 Diabetic Teens face. The website www.Type1ToGo.com provides support materials from her presentations. Anne is also the Co-Founder of Cy Fair Type One Connection, a T1 School Advocacy & Support Group for one of the largest school districts in Texas.

This information provided for general use only.
It is not intended as medical and/or legal advice.
Always consult your doctor for medical advice.
All Rights Reserved. 

Related Blogs 

Related Pages to this Blog

Extracurricular Activities
Brandon Green (Sports with T1D)
504 Plans for Type 1s 

 

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The Impact of High Blood Sugars on Athletic Performance

The Impact of High Blood Sugars on Athletic Performance

The Impact of High Blood Sugars on Athletic Performance

The Impact of High Blood Sugars
on Athletic Performance

“It’s interesting to hear people talk about what they imagine high blood sugars do to athletic performance.”

Some people (those unfamiliar with Type 1 Diabetes) equate the “sugar high” of a small child with that of a T1D high blood sugar (glucose level). Any T1D will tell you that is far from the truth. I have had non-diabetics “joke” with me “You should just load yourself up with a bunch of sugar, get real high and you’ll be bouncing off the walls.”

Keep in mind, I like a little diabetes humor in my life and I value my friends for their creativity. My best friends know me well enough to join me in making fun of, and finding humor, in the disease. I know everyone is different but I feel laughter is just good for the soul!

But in this case, it’s not really as fun as it sounds and let me explain why…

Writing “under the influence”…

This particular blog is very easy for me to write as I was experiencing some low blood sugars earlier today. Then my levels spiked unexpectedly at dinner. Now you could say I am definitely writing this “under the influence” …of my 310 blood sugar from 10 minutes ago!

High Blood Sugars aren’t much fun at all

So instead of “bouncing off the walls” as some presume, my cheeks and lips are feeling uncomfortably dry. Even though I was in the restroom 10 minutes ago, I have that slight need “to go” feeling. My legs are a little tingly, and I’m a bit light‑headed.

Type 1 Diabetes and Sports

Blood sugar levels can affect performance from school athletics to the professional level.

The Better control, the more your feel it…

If you are a Type 1 Diabetic,  you know what I’m talking about. If you are not, I hope I have enlightened you as to why this is not as much fun as you might think. It’s common, it happens more than we T1s like to admit . And  it can actual do some pretty serious damage to my body over time.

The symptoms can vary from person to person and even from event to event. And the better control you have on your blood sugars, the more you feel the effect when you do go “high”.

Dealing with High Blood Sugars in the NFL

As an athlete, both at Rice University and in the NFL, I have learned a lot about dealing with high blood sugars and their impact on performance. For some reason, my time with the St. Louis Rams is more memorable than others, maybe because the Rams played in a dome.

Different environments, different adjustments

I learned to read my body thru the years and knew the impact a “dome” environment would have in detail. Things like humidity, heat index, etc. don’t “trick” your mind and you don’t feel their effect as much. I learned to make different “adjustments” when I was going to be competing in a dome.

High Blood Sugars meant half the number of plays…

I was 6’3” tall and 265 lbs at my preferred playing weight. On a “good” game day (defined as level blood sugars for several days prior), I could handle 5 kickoffs at full speed and compete in 8 consecutive plays before my body began to slow down, negatively affect my performance.

What would really make me mad was going into a game when I was high (blood sugar that is). No matter how hard I tried and how much I didn’t want it to happen, the number of plays I could compete in would be cut in half. If I could normally do 8 plays, I would only be able to complete in 4 plays at my top speed.

Dehydration is dangerous….

If I was high the night before the game, it might be even worse. A high night time blood sugar meant my body had hours to dehydrate before I even realized it.

Dehydration is not only dangerous.
I
t can also cripple the performance of any athlete.

And, as an athlete with diabetes, this will happen whether you are disciplined with your water intake or not.

If you sleep all night with a high blood sugar you will wake up dehydrated.

CGMs made a difference for me

CGMs (Continuous Glucose Monitors) made a huge difference for me in this area.  Everyone has their own opinion on CGMs, but for me, using a CGM made a difference in my athletic performance.

Before my CGM, I used to set my alarm every couple of hours, get up and check my blood sugar.  Now, I love my sleep as much as any man, but I’d rather be woken up in the middle of the night and give myself a shot, than to wake up dehydrated and feeling like I didn’t sleep at all.

Being woken up 4 times a night to check my blood sugar vs. waking up high is a pretty crummy choice to have to make…

I recall going back and forth on this issue, and that should tell you that when my professional career was on the line, it was important enough to try some pretty drastic measures!

CGMs do offer an advantage

So it’s my personal view that CGMs offer an advantage for Type 1 Diabetic athletes. You can get great sleep the night before a game, waking only if your blood sugar gets above the range you set. If your blood sugar stays stable thru the night then you get great sleep without interruption.

Either way, you are better prepared to perform at your best.

The point is…

Whatever works for you- whether its traditional testing or a CGM- the point is to keep those glucose readings level.

High Blood sugars wreak havoc on your body so do whatever you can to keep level.  And especially avoid the night time highs!

It’s worth the effort and it can be done…you will see a huge difference in your performance!

This information provided for general use only.
It is not intended as medical and/or legal advice.
Always consult your doctor for medical advice.
All Rights Reserved. 

Written by Brandon Green
published on 5/16/2017 by Type 1 To Go

Brandon Green was diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes at the age of 10. He has played a multitude of sports throughout High School. He has a degree in Kinesiology from Rice University where he played football throughout college. Brandon played in the NFL with the Jacksonville Jaguars, St. Louis Rams and ended his career with the Seattle Seahawks. In addition to playing sports at all levels, Brandon has coached Middle School and High School sports. For athletics and diabetes, he brings a complete perspective from player to coach.

An avid spokesman for Type 1 Diabetes, Brandon Green is a motivational speaker encouraging children and families living with diabetes. In addition to his professional career with Sundance Memory Care, he blogs and provides support for www.Type1ToGo.com. For more information on Brandon Green, please visit his page here.

For updates on blogs,
please LIKE our Facebook page
or Follow us on Twitter!

 Related Blogs to this Post

Related Tools to this Topic

Athletic Practices Guide for Diabetics by Brandon Green

Coaches Playbook for Diabetics by Brandon Green 

Extracurricular Activities Checklist  (For Diabetic Students in Public School) 

Copyright © 2017 Type 1 To Go Resolutions. All Rights Reserved.
Disclosure & Disclaimer Page

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