The 48 Hour Rule – Parenting a Teen with Type 1 Diabetes

The 48 Hour Rule – Parenting a Teen with Type 1 Diabetes

The 48 Hour Rule
Parenting a Type 1 Diabetic Teen

Raising two teens has taught me a little secret rule. It’s simple. 48 hours! The 48 Hour Rule can be a very useful tool when parenting a Type 1 Diabetic teen. How do I know this? Because I have implemented this rule for both my teens, including the one without diabetes.

Parenting a child with diabetes is challenging. Add in teen hormones, independence seeking behavior and self-management trials and any chance of remaining sane is over. You will constantly be asking yourself “Do I parent the teen?” OR “Do I parent the teen with diabetes?”

Tristan Edgar is living now with Type 1 Diabetes

 

Tristan & Bella Edgar.
Tristan

has been
living with
Type 1 Diabetes
since age 12.

 

Working alongside Brandon Green, I get to hear his “Coach’s Perspective” often. If you have a child athlete, you have probably heard this by now. “Don’t complain to the coach for 48 hours following a game.. blah blah blah…” Obviously, it’s meant to allow for a cooling off period and 48 hours can give you a completely different perspective.

 

Anne Imber & Brandon Green. 

Anne speaks on parenting 
issues with Type 1 Diabetes. 

As a Type 1, Brandon shares
his experience playing football 
in the NFL. He speaks on 
playing sports with Type 1 Diabetes.

The 48 Hour Rule can apply to
coaching & parenting. 

Anne Imber & Brandon Green from Type 1 To Go

The “Coach’s 48 Hour Rule” can translate effectively for parenting too.  I had a couple of goals raising a son with T1D 1) Keep him alive 2) Coach him towards independence 3) Maintain a “loving” relationship. Goals #1 & #2 could be quite daunting at times but #3 was important to me too!

Why? Because we still needed to be not only a team, but a family even after our son became an adult at 18. He is 500 miles away at college now, and we are still very much a part of his care team. The coaching continues with him just with a lot more independence.

How does the 48 hour rule work when parenting a T1D teen? A good example is when those very emotional high and low BG levels hit. Waiting for 48 hours to discuss the “Why’s?” and “How to prevent it next time”  allows for a more rational and beneficial discussion, away from the emotion and blame period. And that’s what helps you accomplish #3 – Maintaining a loving relationship.

“Safety should always be a priority!”

Of course, it is imperative to resolve immediate issues regarding BG levels. Safety is always the first priority. It’s just better to manage the “coaching” side of things at a later date. My biggest regret looking back on Tristan’s teen years was not recognizing how totally wiped out he would be after an incident. These BG battles would totally exhaust him for a full day after.

The 48 hour rule prevented me from parenting from a “fear perspective” and meant the discussion happened when he felt better too. We both were in a better place to start a dialogue -what we learned to call T1D Teachable moments. After all, our #2 goal was to coach him to independence. Although you don’t wish for this, a DKA or hypoglycemic episode could provide some great teaching moments. You can read more about T1D Teachable moments here.

So there are actually many similarities between parenting a person with diabetes and coaching. Some of the same rules can apply. And they work on non-T1Ds too. Especially if it’s your teen daughter. Yes, I have a boy AND a girl.  

My daughter is the happiest child on earth except when she is 1) hungry 2) tired 3) hormonal.

I can help her fix being hungry and tired but that hormone thing?!

Well the 48 hour rule comes in handy there too. On the surface she may appear to be upset about some inconsequential issue.

If I dive right in, I may inadvertently become part of the “issue”…

Anne Imber blogs about raising teens with Type 1 Diabetes

I actually have this “stoic MOM face” that I use with her when she gets hormonal. She hates it… she tries to engage me…but I hold firm with my 48 hour rule. I smile timidly and back away quietly.

Usually 48 hours later I discover I have saved myself a lot of wasted energy and possibly some hurt feelings. Mission accomplished – maintained the “loving” relationship (and my sanity)!

The 48 hour rule is worth a try with or without diabetes. It just happens to work really well whether you are coaching a teen with diabetes to independence OR raising a teenage daughter!

My older sister always reminds me if we don’t kill our kids when they are teenagers then God gives us grandchildren…who hopefully act just like their parents did!

Written by Anne Imber
published on 10/24/2017 on www.Type1ToGo.com 

Anne Imber is the mom to a Type 1 Diabetic son diagnosed in 2009. As the Founder of Type 1 To Go Teen, Anne shares her experiences with other Type 1 families regarding many of the non-medical issues that Type 1 Diabetic Teens face. The website www.Type1ToGo.com provides support materials from her presentations. Anne is also the Co-Founder of Cy Fair Type One Connection, a T1 School Advocacy & Support Group for one of the largest school districts in Texas.

Tristan Edgar has agreed to let his mom share their stories about raising a Type 1 Diabetic Teen. The family hopes their experiences can benefit other families living with diabetes.

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This information provided for general use only.
It is not intended as medical and/or legal advice.
Always consult your doctor for medical advice.
All Rights Reserved. 

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Book Review Adam Brown’s Diabetes Guide

Book Review Adam Brown’s Diabetes Guide

Book Review
Adam Brown's Guide to Diabetes
Bright Spots & Landmines

At Type 1 To Go we are always looking for great resources for our families. This past summer, one of the most anticipated books was Adam Brown’s Diabetes Guide. Bright Spots & Landmines is a refreshing and informative book written by a young man with Type 1 Diabetes.

Bright Spots & Landmines The Diabetes Guide

 

Many of you already know Adam from his insightful blog posts for The diaTribe Foundation.

Check out Adam's Corner!

I love Adam’s writing style so I was anxiously looking forward to his book and it did not disappoint.  As expected, I found a book optimistically written with helpful tips on living with diabetes.

From a parent perspective, I found it to be very encouraging and full of motivating quotes. Truly inspirational!

Adam uses the low carb/high fat method of managing his diabetes but this book is about so much more! As a young professional, Adam shares what has worked for him personally. Without endorsing one diet over another, the LCHF method is what helps Adam.

As a mom of a person with diabetes, I have raised a teen with Type 1 so I know that you will have many challenges. A strict form of eating may not work in some families. We encourage you to find what works for you and your child.

I often recall the wise words of Dr. Barbara Anderson, Psychologist from Texas Children’s Hospital in Houston. She once asked us in a parenting seminar “Have you ever failed at a diet?” Well of course, I had! That one question reminded me to never judge my son when it came to his eating.

I do believe strongly in empowerment through education. A good book is better than partial pieces of information from the internet! Adam’s dietary suggestions are packed full of information that could be very enlightening to some teens preparing to live on their own.

At T1ToGo, we are all about T1D Teen Transition and providing helpful tools. That’s one of the reasons I wanted to share this book review. Adam’s writing style is so fun and easy to read – this is actually a book a teen would read!

Yes, a book a teen with diabetes would want to read!!! If they are old enough and choose to do the low carb/high fat method then this book offers some sound advice in that area. This book is not just about eating with diabetes – there’s tons of other helpful content!

Most importantly, a teen reading this book would find it inspiring and motivating. The pages are full of encouragement and suggestions on setting goals with diabetes. Anytime I find a book that encourages teens – I am all about that!

Adam’s perspective offers insight into the landmines associated when living with this chronic condition. I fell in love with this book as a parent because it’s realistic and honest! It’s a great read for both teens and parents.

All the proceeds from sales of this book benefit the non-profit The diaTribe Foundation which is all about improving the lives people with diabetes. It’s worth the money and it goes to a great cause.

Amazon offers this book, you can pick up your copy of Adam Brown’s Bright Spots & Landmines right here.

For more information on Adam's Blog, visit www.diatribe.org

Written by Anne Imber
published on 11/5/2017 on www.Type1ToGo.com 

Anne Imber is the mom to a Type 1 Diabetic son diagnosed in 2009. As the Founder of Type 1 To Go Teen, Anne shares her experiences with other Type 1 families regarding many of the non-medical issues that Type 1 Diabetic Teens face. The website www.Type1ToGo.com provides support materials from her presentations. Anne is also the Co-Founder of Cy Fair Type One Connection, a T1 School Advocacy & Support Group for one of the largest school districts in Texas.

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please LIKE our Facebook page
or Follow us on Twitter!

This information provided for general use only.
It is not intended as medical and/or legal advice.
Always consult your doctor for medical advice.
All Rights Reserved. 

Related Pages to this Post

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MedAngel A Must Have for Disaster Preparations

MedAngel A Must Have for Disaster Preparations

MedAngel –  A must have for disaster preparations! 

Keeping insulin at safe temperature levels

“Hurricane preparedness” requires extra thought when you have a person with diabetes in the family. Other families don’t have to worry about whether loss of power means ruined vials of life-saving insulin. MedAngel is a must have for disaster preparations.  We proved that after Hurricane Harvey hit Houston recently. Fortunately, we were already using it for our son’s insulin. I never imagined the role this small device would play during the disaster relief efforts of T1 Team Texas.

MedAngel is a must have for disaster preparations

 

 

The MedAngel device
uses Bluetooth
technology & an App
to  monitor temperatures!

 

 

Prior to the arrival of Hurricane Harvey, our Type 1 Diabetes community exchanged the usual advice for keeping insulin cool – freezing extra ice, Frio bags & coolers.  I also personally recommended using MedAngel. This small app driven device monitors temperature levels for medications. If your insulin temperatures dip below safe levels, an alarm on your phone will warn you.

Here is an example of the app on my phone in three different modes:

 

I have been a big fan of MedAngel since it first came on the market. When we lived in Italy, we had to keep a year’s worth of insulin in our home fridge for our Type 1 Diabetic son. Italy is a beautiful place to live, but it was not unusual to lose power in our villa  up to seven times a day! Being sure his insulin was always kept at the appropriate temperature was a challenge.

When I first read about MedAngel, I knew immediately how important this device could be during power outages and when we traveled. Now that we are back in the states, we have TWO MedAngel sensors. One for home and one at school for my college age son. (He shares a fridge with other guys and it’s helpful to know his insulin is always safe!)

Harvey brought 43-63 inches of rain!!!

Nothing could have prepared us for the wide spread damage Harvey caused.  The majority of the Gulf Coast of Texas from Corpus Christi to the Louisiana border was devastated by high winds, tornadoes and unprecedented flooding. Due to its slow path in and out of the Gulf of Mexico, rainfall amounts were between 43-63 inches over the course of just a few days!

Flood waters destroyed homes, businesses, pharmacies and the entire infrastructure of cities.  Insulin and diabetes supplies were in high demand for shelters and displaced people.  With the help of some key community diabetes leaders, we formed T1 Team Texas to meet the immediate critical care needs of the diabetes community.

 T1 Team Texas was a grassroots volunteer organization 
established to meet immediate diabetes care needs following
the impact of Hurricane Harvey in Houston, Texas.

T1 Team Texas relied strictly on volunteers and donated supplies. We had four hubs, set up in volunteer homes, that received donated insulin throughout the Houston area. We then used volunteer drivers to reach people with diabetes, shelters, hospitals and city emergency service centers.

Throughout the four hubs,
T1 Team Texas volunteers
were storing thousands of
dollars of donated insulin.
Volunteers (left to right)
Anne Imber
Whitney Talbot
Kim Allaire

T1 Team Texas Volunteers

MedAngel was on T1 Team Texas too!

We emptied our fridges to make room for every variation of insulin you could imagine. My house served as one of those hubs. I worried about losing power so I made sure my MedAngel sensor was properly placed with my insulin donations.

And, of course, we did lose power! TWICE! When one of the outages ran longer than we anticipated, I ran to transfer my supply of donated insulin to a friend’s house.

During this process of re-packing insulin, I removed the sensor and set it on the counter. Within three minutes the MedAngel alarm on my phone was screaming that the “insulin” temperature was rising!!! Thankfully the actual insulin had already been placed safely in the fridge, but that alarm reminded me what a great little tool my MedAngel was!

Our experience in Italy taught us the importance of having a convenient temperature measurement tool for my son's insulin. Sending my son away to college emphasized it. Living in an area devastated by a hurricane solidified it!

So now you know why I highly recommend the MedAngel device. And I am delighted to share that, in honor of T1 Team Texas, MedAngel is offering a 15% off discount to our readers! Just use the promotion code “Team Texas” when you order. I hope that all my friends in the Gulf Coast region will add a MedAngel to their diabetes tool chest – and do it now, before the next hurricane arrives!

And thanks to MedAngel for being a part of the “Team Texas” efforts!

Use code “TeamTexas”
for 15% off your order.

Click on the photo to go
directly to
www.MedAngel.co USA Shop

 

 

Written by Anne Imber
published on 10/24/2017 on www.Type1ToGo.com 

Anne Imber is the mom to a Type 1 Diabetic son diagnosed in 2009. As the Founder of Type 1 To Go Teen, Anne shares her experiences with other Type 1 families regarding many of the non-medical issues that Type 1 Diabetic Teens face. The website www.Type1ToGo.com provides support materials from her presentations. Anne is also the Co-Founder of Cy Fair Type One Connection, a T1 School Advocacy & Support Group for one of the largest school districts in Texas.

Tristan Edgar has agreed to let his mom share their stories about raising a Type 1 Diabetic Teen. The family hopes their experiences can benefit other families living with diabetes.

For updates on blogs,
please LIKE our Facebook page
or Follow us on Twitter!

This information provided for general use only.
It is not intended as medical and/or legal advice.
Always consult your doctor for medical advice.
All Rights Reserved. 

Related Pages to this Post

Copyright © 2017 Type 1 To Go Resolutions. All Rights Reserved.
Disclosure & Disclaimer Page

Hope when Living with Type 1 Diabetes

Hope when Living with Type 1 Diabetes

Hope when Living with Type 1 Diabtes - a different perspective

Hope when Living with Type 1 Diabetes

Hope. It is so important when living with Type 1 Diabetes. Hope for a cure. Hope for advances in technology. Hope to make it through each day. Hope simply to make it through the night. We almost lost our T1 son one night so we are keenly aware of that hope. That hope is something you can never take for granted when you have a person with diabetes in the family. 

Yet, when I asked my college age son what he hoped for with Type 1 Diabetes, I truly expected he would say ”Hope for a Cure!” Instead I was blown away by his answer…

No, he was not holding out hope for a cure.

Tristan Edgar is living now with Type 1 Diabetes

 

College student,
Tristan Edgar
has been
living with
Type 1 Diabetes
since age 12.

Shocked, I asked “Why???”

His answer was simply, “I have Type 1 Diabetes and I am fine with that. It’s who I am.”

Of course, my first reaction was to be sad. Diagnosed at age 12, he has lived with this chronic condition through his teen years and into adulthood. No, it has not been easy. We have had some really close calls. Yet, his response was that he would not change having Type 1.

When a family is first hit with a T1D diagnosis, it is pretty common for them to immediately start hoping for a cure. Why is it taking so long??? Families dive into fundraising.  They focus on reviewing the latest research and following the newest diabetes management tools. We all need hope. We just can’t imagine living without hope.

“Hope is essential to surviving with a Type 1 diabetes diagnosis.”

Personally, I do have hope. We continue to support any and all efforts despite my son’s “reality based” attitude. We won’t give up on hope because I am incredibly optimistic with the strides that have been made.

I WILL have hope for him.

Saddened initially by his answer, I am now elated regarding his incredible attitude.

Nope, my son is not holding out hope for a cure.

In reality, he is not waiting to start his life when a cure is found.

He is living NOWwith or without diabetes. It is who he is!

And like many with people with diabetes, he is not going to let it slow him down.

Could it be by some miracle, I have raised a well-balanced young adult???

Living with Type 1 Diabetes is just who he is, and he would not change that. So yes, I will rejoice that he lives his life without letting it stop him.

I should be honest though…we, as a family, will continue to hope for a cure. We know that with his diagnosis, Type 1 has invited itself into our family’s future. We can’t give up because there is that “chance” that it could impact his children someday. That’s what motivates me as his mom! I will do this for HIS children.

We have had many T1D Teachable moments raising our son. Those are situations that initially look like diabetes “failures” but ultimately turn out to be great learning opportunities.  Well, this one was mine

He is happy therefore I am happy.

What more could a mom hope for?

Written by Anne Imber
published on 10/17/2017 on www.Type1ToGo.com 

Anne Imber is the mom to a Type 1 Diabetic son diagnosed in 2009. As the Founder of Type 1 To Go Teen, Anne shares her experiences with other Type 1 families regarding many of the non-medical issues that Type 1 Diabetic Teens face. The website www.Type1ToGo.com provides support materials from her presentations. Anne is also the Co-Founder of Cy Fair Type One Connection, a T1 School Advocacy & Support Group for one of the largest school districts in Texas.

Tristan Edgar has agreed to let his mom share their stories about raising a Type 1 Diabetic Teen. The family hopes their experiences can benefit other families living with diabetes.

For updates on blogs,
please LIKE our Facebook page
or Follow us on Twitter!

This information provided for general use only.
It is not intended as medical and/or legal advice.
Always consult your doctor for medical advice.
All Rights Reserved. 

Related Pages to this Post

Our family supports JDRF by supporting walk team members and presenting JDRF fundraising walks at local elementary schools. Tristan's dad, Ed Edgar,  will be running the Chevron Houston Marathon on the JDRF team!

We place our Hope in JDRF!
Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation 

 

Copyright © 2017 Type 1 To Go Resolutions. All Rights Reserved.
Disclosure & Disclaimer Page

The Best Thing about Diabetes is the People

The Best Thing about Diabetes is the People

The Best Thing about Diabetes is the People

The Best Thing about Diabetes is the People

It’s true. There are actually some GOOD things about diabetes. Without a doubt,  the best thing about diabetes is the people. It is not a club you would voluntarily join but once you are in, you can’t help but feel embraced.

Personally, without the support of the Diabetes Online Community(DOC) in the Houston area, our family would have been completely lost upon our son’s Type 1 diabetes diagnosis. Now, as the “experienced” family, we make a huge effort to give back by supporting the Type 1 community.

The Power of People

Here is another good thing about diabetes. There are so many ways to give back. There are numerous non-profits and countless causes  who need our support!

Many have the means and connections to give back financially. Others donate their time. Advocacy efforts can shape the future. It takes an army of passionate people to advocate for the many issues impacting our families.

The power of people is astonishing, especially when we work together.

The best thing about diabetes is the people especially those who helped with disaster relief.

 

Great volunteers were
the reason 
T1 Team Texas
efforts 
were a success!
Volunteers:
Nicole Barton, Sonya Wooley,
Michelle Kalleson & Kaitlin Bear

 

The DOC – Diabetes Online Community

We are immensely blessed to live in a world of the DOC. The Diabetes Online Community enables us to create a tighter T1D family, break down barriers, offer support, wisdom and pull together team efforts almost instantly.  A rush to respond is what we experienced when our diabetes community was in turmoil after Hurricane Harvey ravaged the Gulf Coast of Texas.

 T1 Team Texas was a grassroots volunteer organization 
established to meet immediate diabetes care needs following
the impact of Hurricane Harvey in Houston, Texas.

T1 Team Texas – Diabetes Disaster Relief Team

When Kelley Champ Crumpler and I decided we would “do something”, we knew we had the DOC team behind us. We did not ask, we just knew we could make it happen. Almost immediately, Dr. Stephen Ponder joined us and there was no stopping what was started.

The wave of need was great. We had no choice but to deliver!

Our most valuable resource – People!

Seeing what we were able to accomplish was an amazing experience. Although the three of us took the lead, it was clearly a group effort. Our team’s most valuable resource was simple – PEOPLE! Hundreds of people who were willing to donate their time, supplies and efforts. Total PEOPLE POWER!

The diabetes community rallied around Houston but reached more than just our area. Getting supplies out in Houston was just the starting point. The love was felt throughout the entire Gulf Coast region impacted by Harvey’s flooding and devastation. When the call went out, hundreds of donations were sent by individuals eager to help. The notes sent were an encouragement and motivation during this exhausting process.

Kelley Champ Crumpler of T1 Team Texas delivers supplies to Beaumont.


Kelley Champ Crumpler 

used her home as a hub
for diabetes donations. 
She coordinated & organized
thousands of supplies
for 
 T1 Team Texas. 

T1D, Dr. Neil Burrell helped
with allocation of supplies
in the Beaumont area. 

Bound together in crisis

Our diabetes community united to help each other and it was mind boggling. In addition to supplies, we had countless people step forward to deliver those supplies. Some even waded through high water to get to families who had been without insulin for days. Many donated their time to organize supplies or to follow-up with those in need.  People shared whatever they had to help others and they dropped everything to do it.

Type 1 and Type 2 were bound together in this crisis.  If we had what you needed, we did our best to get it to you. The generosity of the diabetes community was so overwhelming we were able to share supplies donated to Houston to those affected by Hurricanes Irma and Marie too.

Your support and love was spread far and wide.  Donations were put to good use and were greatly appreciated wherever they were received.

Dr. Ponder and Anne Imber deliver diabetes supplies to ship to V.I.

Dr. Stephen Ponder continued
to coordinate diabetes supply
donations to the Virgin Islands
following Hurricanes
Irma and Maria.

Dr. Ponder, known for his
Sugar Surfing workshops,
utilized his network of supporters
to access volunteers and donations.

Anne Imber provided supplies
from T1 Team Texas donations.

Spurs NBA star, Tim Duncan provided many trips on his aircraft to provide supplies to the islands.

We are better together

Following the hurricane, we saw major non-profits such as ADA, JDRF and Insulin for Life pull their efforts to become ONE in the efforts to help. Beyond Type 1 was instrumental in sharing this information on their website and social media. T1 Team Texas addressed the immediate critical needs during a catastrophic period. Working together, ALL teams were needed to meet the tremendous need!

What matters most is that we pull together when we need to! A little hurricane…or two… has taught us that!

We, the Diabetes Online Community, are most definitely stronger together!

 

 

 

THANKS Y'ALL!!!

Families sent notes to T1 Team Texas in the boxes of donations.

Header Image Credit:

T1D Non-profit TheBetesBros delivered supplies gathered in Oklahoma for T1 Team Texas.
Families throughout the U.S. supported our diabetes disaster relief efforts.
Little known fact:  We have no group photos of Dr. Stephen Ponder, Kelley Champ Crumpler & Anne Imber
because we all worked from separate locations throughout our disaster relief efforts.

Written by Anne Imber
published on 10/9/2017 on www.Type1ToGo.com 

Anne Imber is the mom to a Type 1 Diabetic son diagnosed in 2009. As the Founder of Type 1 To Go Teen, Anne shares her experiences with other Type 1 families regarding many of the non-medical issues that Type 1 Diabetic Teens face. The website www.Type1ToGo.com provides support materials from her presentations. Anne is also the Co-Founder of Cy Fair Type One Connection, a T1 School Advocacy & Support Group for one of the largest school districts in Texas.

For updates on blogs,
please LIKE our Facebook page
or Follow us on Twitter!

This information provided for general use only.
It is not intended as medical and/or legal advice.
Always consult your doctor for medical advice.
All Rights Reserved. 

Related Pages to this Post

 

You can find additional information on the diabetes disaster relief efforts with these organizations.

American Diabetes Association 
Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation 

Insulin for Life has been instrumental in providing insulin following the numerous hurricanes this season.
Please continue to support them with your donations.
Insulin for Life

Copyright © 2017 Type 1 To Go Resolutions. All Rights Reserved.
Disclosure & Disclaimer Page

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